Simone Cinotto

Associate Professor of Contemporary History
Convenor of the Master of Gastronomy: World Food Cultures and Mobility program
Evaluation Committee member

Phone: +39 0172 458511
Fax: +39 0172 458500
Email: s.cinotto@unisg.it

University of Gastronomic Sciences | Pollenzo Campus
Piazza Vittorio Emanuele, 9
fraz. Pollenzo – 12042 Bra (Cn) – Italy


Biography

Simone Cinotto is Associate Professor of Modern History at the University of Gastronomic Sciences in Pollenzo, Italy, the University founded in 2004 by the Slow Food Association. His research and teaching interests include Food History and Culture, Migration History, U.S. and Transatlantic History, Modern Italian History, Italian American History, and the History of Consumer Culture.

He is the author of The Italian American Table: Food, Family, and Community in New York City (University of Illinois Press, 2013) and Soft Soil Black Grapes: The Birth of Italian Winemaking in California (New York University Press, 2012); the editor of Making Italian America: Consumer Culture and the Production of Ethnic Identities (Fordham University Press, 2014), which won the 2015 John G. Cawelti Award for the Best Textbook/Primer of the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association; and the coeditor, with Hasia Diner, of Global Jewish Foodways: A History (University of Nebraska Press, 2018). His article “Leonard Covello, the Covello Papers, and the Eating Habits of Italian Immigrants in New York” won the 2004 David Thelen Prize awarded by the Organization of American Historians for the best article on American History published in a language other than English, and was published in the Journal of American History.

Cinotto has been Visiting Professor at Indiana University (2017-2018), Visiting Professor at University of London SOAS (2014-2018), Visiting Scholar of the Center for European and Mediterranean Studies (CEMS) at New York University (2013-2015), Visiting Professor at the Department of Italian Studies at New York University (2008-2009), Fellow of the Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University (2004), Visiting Scholar of the History Department at Columbia University (2007, 2000, 1998), Fellow of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies at Cornell University (2000), and Scholar-in-Residence of the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies-Historical Society of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia (2009, 2000, 1998).

Cinotto is on the Editorial Board of several journals, among which Gastronomica, Food, Culture, and Society, Global Food History, The Graduate Journal of Food Studies, and the Italian American Review.

Cinotto has a long and significant administrative experience, having created and directed for eleven years what is now the Master’s program, “Master of Gastronomy: World Food Cultures and Mobility,” (previously “Food Culture and Communications: Food, Place, and Identities”), at UNISG Pollenzo. The program has so far enrolled and graduated about 500 students from about 60 countries. Throughout the years, Cinotto has invited to teach in the program many of the top international food studies scholars as well as experts, professionals, and activists. The planning and management of the program has included the organization of some 50 study trips to different parts of Italy, Europe, and the rest of the world and the creation of a very large database of opportunities for student internships.

Cinotto current research and publication projects include the global history of food, migration, and mobility and the history of transatlantic consumer cultures in the twentieth century. He has three books in preparation: Cibo: A Modern History of Italian Food (Oxford University Press); The Puerto Ricans and Italians of New York: Migration and Mobilization in the Atlantic World; and Transatlantic Emotions: The Mental and Intimate Biography of an Italian Immigrant to America, 1905-1942

Major Research Areas
  • Food History and Culture
  • Migration History
  • S. and Transatlantic History
  • Modern Italian History
  • Italian American History
  • History of Consumer Culture